FutureNOLA PROJECT

Exhibition

 
 
 

A technologically-advanced and multimedia-based immersion into the next 300 years of New Orleans.

Spawned from a multidisciplinary and positivist climate, the futureNOLA exhibition immerses guests in a visionary portal while leading them through envisioning the next 300 years of New Orleans from diverse perspectives.  The sensory targeted exhibit, opening at the Beaux Arts Ball on January 26, 2019 at the Cabildo, a landmark site in New Orleans history and culture, brings to life a transcendental analysis of historic and futuristic New Orleans using modern, technology-heavy curation methods in combination with physical and tangible objects.

DESCRIPTION

The exhibition will showcase particular submissions from the call-for-ideas. The exhibit will open with a Beaux Arts Ball Gala celebration.  

Content to be curated for exhibition based on submissions could include, but not limited to:

  • Images (renderings, hand-drawings, paintings, etc.)

  • 3D models (physical or digital)

  • Virtual and Augmented Environments (digital)

  • Written submission (poems, narrative, etc.)

  • Performance art (initially recorded and possibly performed live)

  • Soundscapes (recorded)

TIMELINE

  • March 1, 2018: Entry Submission Opens

  • October 7, 2018: Registration deadline for submissions

  • October 28, 2018: Entry Deadline for all submissions.

  • January 2019: Exhibition opens

  • January 26, 2019: Beaux Arts Ball at the Cabildo

  • TBA 2019: End of Exhibition

  • TBA 2019: Publication

COMMON GROUND - A NEW DIRECTION OF EXHIBIT FORMATTING  | DRONES & PROJECTIONS

The driving force behind the internationally-marketed exhibition was triggered by the desire to explore modern curation techniques geared towards highlighting commonalities and distinctions of New Orleans neighborhoods.  

Inspired by Powers of Ten, this immersive and dynamic approach to New Orleans’ cultural heritage and natural landscape uses drone video footage projected onto a Louisiana historic landmark site as its canvas.  Video is taken starting out at ground level +0 feet and move vertically to a height of +300 feet (a nod to the tricentennial).  

This visual content will give its voyeur a dynamic perspective of the city: 

The city is our common ground, 
The horizon is our common ground, 
The future is our common ground. 

A FORWARD-THINKING APPROACH TO CURATION  | SENSORIUM + MODERN CURATION MEET NEW ORLEANS PERSONALITY

This unprecedented exhibition highlights a desire to use a Louisiana Landmark site as the canvas for curating submissions generated by the call-to-ideas.  

The futureNOLA exhibition committee seeks to categorize this exhibition as a continuum—one that derives largely from the focus on the public presentation of distinct multimedia submissions, and incorporating the expertise of individual guest curators.

Reiterating the content expected to be received from the call-for-ideas committee, including but not limited to:  2D images (renderings, hand-drawings, paintings); 3D models (physical or digital), written submission (poems, narratives); performance art (recorded); soundscapes (recorded).

Below are examples of various multimedia exhibition methods using techniques heavily focused on engagement, interaction, interpretation, and technology.

VISUAL SOUND CURATING MUSIC  | HEARING WITH ALL YOUR SENSES

Just like hearing the beautiful music of brass bands through the French Quarter’s street, music submissions for the futureNOLA exhibit should promote communal listening experiences.  Curatorial techniques should emphasize people listening to submitted compositions within the same space via visual representations tied to the musical scores, interactive touch based music explorations or personal music speakers that are shared in an open space.  

RECORDING THE FUTURE CURATING VIDEOS  | VOYEURING THE FUTURE

Video submissions for the exhibit should be showcased in ways that reflect the nature of the content produced.  Potentially explicit content can be shown with “peepholes” positioned at an adult’s eyeheight.  Videos suitable for a larger audience can be displayed through multi-screen layouts, digitally projected 3D surfaces or by utilizing recycled retro televisions or other AV equipment.

TOUCH FREELY CURATING WRITTEN WORD OR PRINT MEDIA | TACTILE IMMERSION OF PRINT MEDIA

Print media submissions should be experienced through immersive techniques that cater to a variety of ages.  Through projection, multiplication, or suspension, many attendees can experience the written word made physical.  

YOUR TURN CURATING INTERACTION | RECORDING RESPONSE

For those visionaries and guests who do not submit to the call for ideas, we propose a place for people to leave their mark on the exhibit. Whether it be an interactive feedback component, or a way to record the city of New Orleans as it is in present day, an interactive space for response should be included in the exhibition.  

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Chartres Street Sculptures.
Chartres Street, Bywater, 2013. Photograph by Scott Heath. Used with permission.